FamiliesYou and your children are welcome to attend the worship service together any Sunday morning, or you can check out our Religious Education Program that takes place at the same time. The first Sunday of every month, children 4 years old through fifth graders attend the first part of the service with their families to share the Time for All Ages then go to their Religious Education groups.

We are a large church and have a large children and youth program of 250 young people. We offer somewhat different programming at 9 and 11 a.m. We have learned over the years that families with younger children tend to be early risers, so they often find it best to attend the early service and RE program. Then as children age and like to sleep in, our later program becomes a better fit.

Register your child for the 2017/18 church year

9 a.m. Session of Religious Education

Nursery and toddler care for infants through 3-year-olds is provided by our paid adult caregivers, paid JUC teens and additional volunteers. Our youngest children enjoy an hour of supervised play and care. Parents and guardians are invited to come in, meet the staff and stay as long as you like. We know your trust and comfort are integral to your youngsters feeling safe and comfortable in our Nursery/Toddler Room.

Our preschool group is for 3 and 4 -year-olds as they begin to learn our Unitarian Universalist rituals and stories. They are guided by an adult staff person who is assisted by a combination of paid teens and volunteers. Their time is informed by, Chalice Children, a curriculum which helps them build a foundation for their spiritual lives in Unitarian Universalism. There is also time to make friends, play with our dress up clothes and blocks and read books that support our values.

Our kindergarten/first grade group and second-fifth grade group will use curriculum we are creating that explores the same monthly themes used in Sunday worship services. The groups are lead by four-person teams of JUC volunteers and will explore the themes using age-appropriate activities, stories and songs. Our hope is that conversations between children, youth, parents, grandparents and guardians will take place on the way home from JUC as well as throughout the week. The church year will begin with an exploration of what it means to be people of Covenant.

11 a.m. Session of Religious Education

Prog Child & Youth

Nursery and toddler care for infants through 3-year-olds is provided by our paid adult caregivers, paid JUC teens and additional volunteers. Our youngest children enjoy an hour of supervised play and care. Parents and guardians are invited to come in, meet the staff and stay as long as you like. We know your trust and comfort are integral to your youngsters feeling safe and comfortable in our Nursery/Toddler Room.

Our preschool group is for 3 and 4 -year-olds as they begin to learn our Unitarian Universalist rituals and stories. They are guided by an adult staff person who is assisted by a combination of paid teens and volunteers. Their time is informed by, Chalice Children, a curriculum which helps them build a foundation for their spiritual lives in Unitarian Universalism. There is also time to make friends, play with our dress up clothes and blocks and read books that support our values.

Our kindergarten-third grade group will use curriculum we are creating that explores the same monthly themes used in Sunday worship services. The group is lead by four-person teams of JUC volunteers and will explore the themes using age-appropriate activities, stories and songs. Our hope is that conversations between children, youth, parents, grandparents and guardians will take place on the way home from JUC as well as throughout the week. The church year will begin with an exploration of what it means to be people of Covenant.

Our fourth-fifth grade group will also use the theme-based curriculum with some additional add-on’s. During the winter time, for eight consecutive Sunday mornings, we will offer Our Whole Lives, our comprehensive sexuality curriculum specifically designed for this age group. It will be during the 11:00 session only, so if you want your fourth or fifth grader to receive OWL education this year be sure to sign up for the 11:00 session. In addition, this year, the Nature Keepers program will be integrated into our fourth-fifth grade programming. Once a month, this group will be invited to extend their time together for this nature-based, scout-like club where they will deepen friendships and learn about the local environment while continuing to explore the monthly theme. More information will be coming soon about both, the fourth-fifth OWL program and the fourth-fifth Nature Keepers program.

Our sixth grade group explores our Neighboring Faiths as a way to increase our young people’s understanding and appreciation for religious diversity and to reflect on the unique and universality of religious experience. Throughout the year, they visit a number of other worship experiences in other religious traditions.

Our seventh grade group curriculum is Our Whole Lives, a comprehensive sexuality program, which helps participants make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual health and behavior. With a holistic approach, Our Whole Lives provides accurate, developmentally appropriate information about a range of topics, including relationships, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexual health, and cultural influences on sexuality. A parent orientation is required for participation.

Our eighth grade group spends the year in our Coming of Age program. These young people make the transition from child to youth guided by facilitators and mentors, using team-building, mentored learning, group discussions, fun, and service projects.

Our high school group, Young Religious Unitarian Universalists (YRUU), practices how to put their faith into action every day by daring to be real, showing acceptance and support, leading with courage, and acting for justice. After all, what is religion for if it isn’t about changing your life—and changing the world—for the better? They worship together, grow a sense of community, practice skills of leadership, followership, listening, social and emotional risk-taking, and find places to act on their Unitarian Universalist values and idealism.